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National Investment Trust Ltd (NITL.mu) HY2014 Interim Report

first_imgNational Investment Trust Ltd (NITL.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Investment sector has released it’s 2014 interim results for the half year.For more information about National Investment Trust Ltd (NITL.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the National Investment Trust Ltd (NITL.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: National Investment Trust Ltd (NITL.mu)  2014 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileNational Investment Trust Limited is a privately owned investment trust company that provides services for individuals and corporate investors. The company engages in the launching and management of equity and fixed income mutual funds for its clients. NITL invests in equity and fixed income markets. National Investment Trust Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritiuslast_img read more

Central New York: Bishop Adams will resign in 2016

first_img Submit a Press Release House of Bishops, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Gladstone B. “Skip” Adams III[Episcopal News Service] Diocese of Central New York Bishop Gladstone B. “Skip” Adams III recently announced that he will resign in the fall of 2016.Adams, 62, was ordained and consecrated in October 2001 as the diocese’s tenth bishop.He recently sent the following letter to the people of the diocese.March 24, 2015Dear People of Central New York:With love to all of the people of the faith communities of our beloved Diocese, I write to inform you that I have indicated to the Standing Committee my intention to resign as your Bishop Diocesan on or about October 31, 2016. At that time I will be concluding fifteen years as your Bishop. As best I can tell personally and drawing on wise people around me in prayerful discernment, this is a good time for a transition to new possibilities for the ongoing health of the Diocese in service of Christ’s mission.Being your Bishop is an amazing privilege for which I will always be grateful. It has formed me and drawn things from me in ways that I could never have imagined. By grace I believe it has made me a more deeply faithful person. This wonderful and, at the same time, crazy vocation as Bishop has drawn me over the years to an ever-deepening life of prayer resting in Christ as my center and life. I have all of you to thank for that.You may have noted above that I used the word “resign.” That is the specific canonical word, even when the intention is retirement. Even though I am retiring from Central New York, I do intend to allow myself to be available to the Church in any way that God’s Spirit may call forth. I am not stepping aside for any other position, although it is my understanding that once my resignation is public, I will likely receive offers for other opportunities. If it occurs, that will also be a time for discernment bathed in prayer and open to the Spirit who blows wherever she wills.The Standing Committee has met with Bishop Clayton Matthews of the Presiding Bishop’s Office to begin to engage the process of transition to the election of a new bishop. My hope is that this journey to new leadership will be healthy and smooth and I trust the Standing Committee to oversee that process. You will hear more from them as time unfolds, as they are canonically responsible for overseeing this transition. It also means that even as anxiety for the future may raise its head, sometimes in ways we do not expect, it is essential that all along the way we keep our hearts centered on Jesus and the mission to which we are called. Our Gospel work continues.The next nineteen months will offer us many opportunities to connect and prepare well for all that is to come. For now, know that I continue to be your Bishop and I will continue to work hard among you and be fully engaged in our mission “To be the passionate presence of Christ for one another and the world we are called to serve.” Please continue to pray for me as I pray for you.Grace and peace in Christ,+ SkipThe Rt. Rev. Gladstone B. Adams III10th Bishop of Central New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest People Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Posted Mar 27, 2015 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Bishop Elections, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Central New York: Bishop Adams will resign in 2016 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

Pope Francis says he wants to visit South Sudan

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 By Gavin Drake Posted Oct 28, 2016 Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Ecumenical & Interreligious, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Sudan & South Sudan Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Marylin Day says: October 28, 2016 at 8:42 pm Please resolve your differences and protect your citizens. My friends in South Sudan are suffering so much. Perhaps the faith based entities can do what their secular leadership cannot. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Pope Francis says he wants to visit South Sudan An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Africa, [Anglican Communion News Service] During a meeting with South Sudanese church leaders, including Archbishop Daniel Deng Bul of the Episcopal Church of South Sudan and Sudan, Pope Francis said that he wanted to visit the world’s newest country. South Sudan has been hit by wave after wave of violent conflict after it gained independence from Sudan in 2011. On Oct. 27,Deng Bul joined his Roman Catholic and Presbyterian counterparts, Archbishop of Juba Paolino Lukudu Loro, and Moderator Peter Gai Lual Marrow, at the Vatican for a private audience with Pope Francis.Full article. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Comments (1) This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments are closed. Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

Executive Council approves readmission of Cuba, selects Louisville for 2024…

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 General Convention, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Presiding Bishop Michael Curry In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Executive Council approves readmission of Cuba, selects Louisville for 2024 General Convention Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Presiding Bishop Michael Curry embraces Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio of Cuba after the formal readmission of her church into The Episcopal Church at the Executive Council meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Feb. 15, 2020. Photo: Egan Millard/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] Amid the detailed and sometimes tense discussions that took place during the meeting of The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council Feb. 13-15, moments of joy and excitement burst forth. Among the highs of the meeting were the selection of Louisville, Kentucky, as the site of the 2024 General Convention and the formal approval of the readmission of the Episcopal Church of Cuba as a diocese of The Episcopal Church, which elicited an enthusiastic and emotional response from those gathered.Executive Council, a 43-member body tasked with enacting the policies adopted by General Convention, meets at least three times per year. The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, vice-chair of council and president of the House of Deputies, presided over the meeting at the Hilton hotel in downtown Salt Lake City. Presiding Bishop Michael Curry arrived on the meeting’s second day after recovering from a bout of food poisoning.The meeting opened with a somber presentation from several leaders in Native American communities on the deep and lasting impacts of the racist “Doctrine of Discovery.” Forrest S. Cuch and the Rev. Michael Carney of the Diocese of Utah, the Rev. Cornelia Eaton of Navajoland and the Rev. Angela Goodhouse-Mauai of North Dakota shared, through personal and historical narratives, how the church can be an instrument of oppression and erasure of Native peoples or a source of strength and empowerment for them.Kristine Stache speaks to council about membership decline on Feb. 14. Photo: Egan Millard/Episcopal News ServiceAfter a day packed with committee meetings, council reconvened on Feb. 14 to hear a presentation from Kristine Stache, interim president of Wartburg Theological Seminary, an Evangelical Lutheran Church in America affiliate. Stache spoke about how to interpret and respond to The Episcopal Church’s membership decline, as depicted in the most recent parochial report data.The 2018 parochial reports show a 17.5 percent decline in baptized members and a 24.9 percent decline in average Sunday attendance across the church between 2008 and 2018.Stache started off with a brutally honest look at those “very sobering” statistics. If the rate of decline experienced over that decade continues, The Episcopal Church will have no Sunday attendance in 30 years and no baptized members in 47 years. As with other mainline Protestant denominations, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America has experienced a similar decline, with 35 years left until it runs out of baptized members and 23 years until it runs out of Sunday worshippers, if current rates continue.“It depicts a church that appears to be dying,” Stache said. “Perhaps.”But, she argued, other signs show a church that is not dying but transforming.“How is this measured? Through changed lives, which is not one of the questions, I believe, on the parochial reports of the ELCA,” Stache said. “Perhaps the structures and forms of the way we measure church are dying.”Stache encouraged council to see this difficult transformation as a sign of God’s presence, not God’s absence, citing Isaiah 43:18: “Do not remember the former things, or consider the things of old. I am about to do a new thing. Now it springs forth; do you not perceive it?”While “innovation” has become the buzzword of choice in discussions of how to deal with these changes, Stache said, it often consists of creating new pathways to traditional models of ministry or coming up with solutions to perceived problems. But that’s not what the word really means or what the church needs, she argued.“Innovation gives us permission to say, ‘We don’t have it figured out. But we trust that God has a future and it includes the church.’”Instead of coming up with new ways to keep the church as we know it afloat, we should ask new questions and experiment, creating “a culture of failure by which we learn something,” Stache said.The church should become something truly new, “something we have yet to imagine,” she said. “This kind of thinking looks nothing like we’ve ever done before. We don’t have the current knowledge or solutions to address this work. In fact, we can’t even define the problem. But that’s the point. Living in this space is about a mental shift to a focus on questions instead of answers.”That mental shift was already apparent in a discussion of potential changes to the metrics of parochial reports in the Governance and Operations Committee. The Rev. Chris Rankin-Williams, chair of the House of Deputies Committee on the State of the Church, led a discussion of that committee’s work on proposed revisions to the questions parishes are asked.“We’re trying to get data on what are the actual markers of vitality,” Rankin-Williams said.Rankin-Williams expressed a desire – shared by members of the Governance and Operations Committee – to move away from average Sunday attendance as the defining metric of a parish’s health. Other metrics – like weekly service attendance, number of people involved in volunteer activities or the total reach of those activities – might provide a fuller picture, he said.The committee also discussed having a section in which the parish can write its own narrative, so it doesn’t feel like it’s being “graded” by the wider church. Rather than being a burden, the report could be a chance for a parish to do some valuable discernment and tell its own unique story.On Feb. 15, the committees presented their reports to council and all resolutions were passed unanimously. Among them was a resolution to accept the recommendation from the Joint Standing Committee on Planning & Arrangement to select Louisville, Kentucky, as the site for the 81st General Convention in 2024. The Rev. Michael Barlowe, secretary of Executive Council, said Louisville and the two other finalists – Detroit, Michigan, and San Juan, Puerto Rico – were in the same range in terms of cost to the church and convention goers, but Louisville stood out for a few reasons.The last time General Convention met in Province IV – which contains the Diocese of Kentucky – was in 1982 in New Orleans. It’s also Curry’s home province, and this will be his last General Convention as Presiding Bishop. Accessibility was another factor. Louisville is within a day’s drive of 60 percent of the U.S. population, Barlowe said, and the city’s brand-new convention center, several hotels, the Episcopal cathedral and an arena big enough for a revival are all within a 5-minute walk. Having General Convention there will also present a chance to highlight the city’s “breathtaking” work on racial reconciliation in recent years, Barlowe said.Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio of Cuba and the Rev. Gilberto Junco Sotolongo of Cuba join in a round of applause after the formal readmission of their church into The Episcopal Church on Feb. 15. Photo: Egan Millard/Episcopal News ServiceIn his capacity as secretary of General Convention, Barlowe also formally certified that the Episcopal Church of Cuba had met the requirements for readmission to The Episcopal Church as a diocese. At the 2018 General Convention in Austin, Texas, the House of Bishops and House of Deputies voted to readmit Cuba, which the House of Bishops had expelled from the church in 1966.“Our friends from the Episcopal Church in Cuba have been exemplary,” Barlowe told council, “not only in their extraordinary ministries undertaken in such difficult circumstances over the years, but in all of our conversations over the last five or six years as we’ve moved toward this moment.”After a unanimous vote of “sí,” it was official: The Episcopal Church of Cuba became the Episcopal Church in Cuba, to a round of joyful applause.Her voice breaking with emotion, Cuba Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio addressed council in Spanish through an interpreter.“Each one of us has been living [through] a very emotional time in our life in the Diocese of Cuba,” Delgado said, “because the church lived for more than 50 years all by itself.Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio of Cuba expresses thanks to Executive Council. Photo: Egan Millard/Episcopal News Service“I want to express my gratitude to each one of you … who has worked so arduously to achieve this moment. … We will continue serving our people, our country – however, we will do it in your company.”Other resolutions adopted by council included a statement urging Episcopalians and political leaders to fight misinformation and enact election security measures in the United States and elsewhere, an assessment waiver for the Diocese of Alabama, and the adoption of a Covenant for Care of Creation and a plan for its implementation. After a blessing from Curry, the meeting was adjourned on a high note.“We spent Valentine’s Day apart from our loved ones because we love Jesus,” Bishop-elect Frank Logue of Georgia told council on the final morning.The full list of resolutions is available here. The next council meeting will take place June 8-11 in San Juan, Puerto Rico.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Cuba, Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC By Egan MillardPosted Feb 17, 2020 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Executive Council February 2020, Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY General Convention 2024, Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Executive Council, Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Energy workers in France take ‘Robin Hood’ actions

first_imgA march by some divisions of the General Confederation of Labor (CGT) in Marseille, France, May 26. Paris, France, May 27 — In numerous corners of France, workers and students’ struggles continue as May draws to an end. This prolonged duration has hardened the lines of conflict. The fundamental challenge to neoliberal policies implemented by President Emmanuel Macron’s government over a year ago has not wavered. This is true, even though it is hard for many striking families to see their reduced pay slips or to find enough strength to attend the many demonstrations called by general assemblies and trade unions.In the transport sector — at SNCF (the French abbreviation for its railroad system) and sporadically at Air France — strikes have continued for two months on a regular basis. The strike pattern is two days on strike, three days at work. At the SNCF on May 23, the coalition of striking unions announced that 95 percent of the railroad workers consulted were against the neoliberal “reform” of the rail transport sector that the government intends to impose.At countless rallies held periodically in the country’s major cities, civil servants joined contingents of militant railway workers, who were at the forefront of protest movements, and enlarged the common struggle.In early May, Air France’s CEO was forced to resign following the results of an internal referendum that rejected his salary increase proposals, which the workers considered inadequate.Workers in the energy sectors have been at the heart of the struggle since the very beginning — since December 2017, even before the beginning of the railway strike. On Dec. 7 workers in the electricity and gas industries went on strike to weigh in during wage negotiations. A policy of austerity had imposed a freeze on basic national wages in 2017.The electricians and gas workers have long experience in the struggle. The energy sector has been largely privatized in recent years, under pressure from European Union policies of privatization, and opened up to competition. Recent French governments have gone along with the EU’s demands.Imposition of these destructive strategies, aimed at dismantling public energy service — which has an excellent reputation in France — has increased the risk of supply disruptions and caused recurrent restrictions and outages. It has also allowed for different prices to be charged to users in different regions. There have been frequent increases in energy prices borne by individual households. These policies have inflated the profits of private producers that have entered the market to capture the most profitable niches.More often than not, the multiplication of privatized and competing local gas and electricity suppliers is irrational. With so many private operators, there is no mechanism for setting environmental targets in relation to climate commitments for reducing carbon emissions.‘Robin Hood’ actionsStriking electric and gas workers decided to carry out creative approaches to struggle – “Robin Hood” shock operations. They involve cutting power to large companies that lay off employees while making huge profits for shareholders.Another tactic is, conversely, to restore electricity and gas to families in financial difficulty who are unable to pay their energy bills. Often entire working-class districts, or even parts of regions identified as disadvantaged, see their bills reduced thanks to these “Robin Hood” operations.Sometimes, these actions are carried out during demonstrations: Comrades hide their faces, then form a huddle called a “turtle,” somewhat resembling a rugby scrum. They huddle above a manhole cover leading to underground lines. One worker, chosen beforehand and unknown even to fellow workers, goes down the opening to carry out the mission.Once this militant comes out, the “turtle,” fists raised, shouts: “Energy is not private property, it belongs to us!”The demand for renationalization of the energy sector is a priority. “Yes to the public production of electricity and gas!” is one of the workers’ slogans. Energy security and equality for all are the objectives, along with energy independence and a guarantee of meeting the environmental objectives and ecological targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.Energy, essential to all aspects of life, is not a commodity but a common good. And as a common good, resulting from an enormous national investment of equipment created by French workers, it must belong to all. The struggle for public electricity and gas service is today one of the key dimensions of French workers’ struggles.Herrera is a Marxist economist, a researcher at the Centre National Recherche Scientifique, who works at the Centre d’Économie de la Sorbonne, Paris. WW staff translated.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Limerick City will be transformed over the next six months

first_img TAGSCllr Seamus BrownedevelopmentinvestmentLimerick 2030Limerick Citypolitics Advertisement Twitter Limerick people will have their say on ‘bigger picture’ issues Linkedin WhatsApp Email Thefts of catalytic converters on the rise #crimeprevention New parklet changes Catherine Street dining experience RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Previous articleTwo men airlifted to Cork University Hospital following house fire.Next articleWin cinema tickets Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie James Godley of JJ Rhatigan Contractors; Limerick 2030 chairman Denis Brosnan and Pat Daly of Limerick City and County Council at the Gardens International site. ​Photo: Brian ArthurTHREE multi-million euro developments being undertaken by the Limerick Twenty Thirty agency will transform the city and county over the next six months.That’s the prediction from Sinn Fein councillor Seamus Browne, who is a member of the Limerick Twenty Thirty Board of Directors.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up And the Newcastle West representative has no doubt that between Gardens International, the Opera Site and Mungret College developments; the remainder of the year is going to be a busy and productive one.“Gardens International is progressing at pace and we are getting a real sense now of what’s emerging there. It looks a really fantastic mix of the architecture of the old Hanging Gardens and GPO with the glass backdrop of the new building. This is due for completion by end of year and will be fully let as early as next year,” Cllr Browne told the Limerick Post.“There has been a lot of speculation about who the tenants will be and that is commercially sensitive at this stage but the only thing I can say is that there has been very significant interest in the property, here and internationally.”On the Mungret residential development, he said, “This is a project I’m particularly positive about as it proves that Limerick City and County Council, in partnership with Limerick Twenty Thirty, is making very significant strides with regard to tackling housing shortages.“A great thing about Mungret is that it is less than ten minutes from the city centre. If that were a capital city, it would be considered very much part of the city. To one extent it is, but it still will have its very own, unique community feel.“Limerick Twenty Thirty appointed a master-planning team recently for this and they will now set about scoping out the project and, critically, engaging with the local public. It will be a phased project and the beauty about Mungret is that there was so much put in place there over recent years, between schools and amenities, and I know the master-plan team have been given a brief with a very high standard.“We want to do something here that stands out not just in Limerick but in a national context,” he declared.Councillor Browne also believes that the next month is going to tell a lot with regard to the Opera Site.“The Opera Site has probably been one of the most talked about and anticipated developments outside the capital since the turn of the millennium. It ran into difficulties, as did much of the country, when it was planned first but the council had the foresight to take it over and we are on the verge now of the local authority submitting a planning application to An Bord Pleanala and with necessary funding in place, including from two key European agencies.“The actual plans are still a work in progress, though at an advanced stage and I am particularly keen that we will see a really good mix of commercial space with retail culture and public realm. This is a going to be an area of the city that’s bustling during the day and vibrant at night.“Ultimately, we are going in the right direction and while it would be premature to get into any level of detail, the picture of Limerick that will emerge over the coming months will be very exciting indeed and Limerick Twenty Thirty will be at the heart of making this happen,” he concluded.read more politics stories here. Print Vicky calls for right to die with dignity NewsPoliticsLimerick City will be transformed over the next six monthsBy Alan Jacques – June 16, 2018 4822 Facebook Woman arrested and €72,000 seized in Westbury New high-end jobs for Shannonlast_img read more

Buying a Home Before Turning 35

first_img Data revealed by the Urban Institute points out that homebuying sentiment among millennials continues to erode with today’s young adults being less likely to buy a home compared to prior generations, who became homeowners at a younger age. Analyzing the consequences of this trend, Urban Institute elucidated on the consequences of not buying a home before the age of 35. Most of today’s older homeowners bought their first homes before age 35, according to the report that used the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), a dataset that has followed U.S. individuals since 1968, to track people who reached age 60 between 2003 and 2015. The report found that half the older adults in their sample bought their first house when they were between 25 and 34 years old. Twenty-seven percent bought their first home before age 25, with 37 percent of household heads’ ages ranging from 25 – 34 and 13 percent of those aged 18-24 owned a home in 2016. The data in the analysis also highlights the impact of earlier home purchases. Those who bought their first home between ages 25 and 34 have the greatest housing wealth by their sixties, with a median home equity around $150,000 at 60 or 61 years of age. The later the home purchase, the lower are the housing wealth, with home appreciation playing a huge role as years pass by. The median housing wealth of those who bought their first home at the age of  34 and those who waited until they turned 44 reflects a difference of $72,000. If they wait until they are 45 or older, the median wealth is more than $100,000 lower.The report also found that those who bought their houses before turning 25 years old have a median home equity of $130,000. Interestingly,  the youngest buyers have lower incomes, are less educated, and buy lower-priced homes, with the median first-home value being less than $70,000. The median first-home value is around $125,000 for the other three groups. It is worth noting that early home buyers can afford expensive homes and have fewer mortgage debts while in their sixties. Buyers aged 25 and below have lower median house value when they are older due to inadequate education, but have lower mortgage debt as they have owned their homes longer, with a median remaining principal at $11,000. The report states that more young adults should take into account the long-term consequences of renting when homeownership is an option as they are failing to build housing wealth. Related Articles Buying a Home Before Turning 35 Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago November 12, 2018 1,360 Views Home Equity Homebuying Homeownership Millennials mortgage debts Urban Institute 2018-11-12 Donna Joseph Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago  Print This Post The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Buying a Home Before Turning 35 in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Subscribe Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Tagged with: Home Equity Homebuying Homeownership Millennials mortgage debts Urban Institute Share Save Donna Joseph is a Dallas-based writer who covers technology, HR best practices, and a mix of lifestyle topics. She is a seasoned PR professional with an extensive background in content creation and corporate communications. Joseph holds a B.A. in Sociology and M.A. in Mass Communication, both from the University of Bangalore, India. She is currently working on two books, both dealing with women-centric issues prevalent in oppressive as well as progressive societies. She can be reached at [email protected] About Author: Donna Joseph The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: Contesting Crisis-Era RMBS Litigation Next: If Maxine Waters Takes Over the House …last_img read more

23-year-old man charged in connection with Essex lorry deaths

first_img WhatsApp Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter 23-year-old man charged in connection with Essex lorry deaths Pinterest Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Homepage BannerNews A 23-year-old Co Armagh man has been charged in connection with the Essex lorry deaths.39 people were discovered in the back of a refrigerated truck in the UK last month.23-year-old Christopher Kennedy was arrested in Buckinghamshire on Friday afternoon and is due to appear before Chelmsford Magistrates’ Court tomorrow Monday 25th November.Meanwhile, 15 of the 16 migrants found in the back of a Lorry on a ferry to Rosslare last Thursday are no longer in State care.They all sought international protection which is effectively seeking refugee status when they arrived here.They were accommodated in a Dublin direct provision centre, but they were free to leave their accomodation.Gardai have confirmed the 16th member of the group however is a juvenile who has now been taken into the care of the child and family agency, Tusla. WhatsApp Pinterest Harps come back to win in Waterford center_img News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Facebook Previous articleCockhill Celtic held to 1-1 draw in FAI Intermediate Cup- Gavin Cullen reactsNext articleIrish Wheelchair Association urged to meet over closure of respite centre News Highland Twitter Google+ By News Highland – November 24, 2019 Facebook Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic DL Debate – 24/05/21 Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODAlast_img read more

Marine veteran walked 810 miles in 42 days for veteran suicide awareness

first_imgiStock(NEW YORK) — One year after Travis Snyder returned home from deployment in Afghanistan, a close friend from his task force died by suicide.Snyder, 32, knew of the harrowing statistics of suicide among veterans, but his friend’s death last April left him shocked.“Before that, I read about it and had awareness but I didn’t fully understand the magnitude that this epidemic has on people,” Snyder told ABC News on Thursday.There were more than 6,000 veteran suicides in 2017, with an average of 16.8 per day, according to the most recent data from the Department of Veterans Affairs.Snyder felt the need to help, so he came up with a plan: leave his job and apartment to start a mission to raise awareness.He decided on walking around Lake Michigan for 42 days, and creating a Facebook page where he could post daily updates about the cause.On Sunday, Snyder finished his walk with 810 miles under his belt and more than 3,500 people following his journey on Facebook.“I’m still getting messages and phone calls from people who just want to talk and share their story,” Snyder said. “Just when I think I understand the magnitude, I learn more.”During his walk, which he began in Manistee, Michigan, he averaged about 20 miles per day.He planned to sleep outside each night, but was stunned by the acts of kindness that both friends and strangers offered.“Every single day people were reaching out to support the cause whether it was a roof or a meal … I did not sleep outside once,” he said.“I’m just glad that people have built a community together,” added Snyder, who served in Afghanistan as a corporal from October 2017 to April 2018.He hopes his mission will continue to make people “more aware of resources that are available to them and more comfortable to talk about suicide.”Just before speaking to ABC News, Snyder said he got off the phone with a woman from Michigan who lost a loved one to suicide two days before he began his walk.He plans to keep the Facebook page open for that exact reason: so more people can reach him.“I feel humbled and honored to share the burden of those who are still healing from losing a loved one or feeling the pain of someone going through challenges that they’ve been facing,” he said.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

LOTS OF LUCK, DONALD TRUMP

first_imgMaking Sense by Michael ReaganNow comes the hard part.Now comes the part where Donald Trump has to appeal to everyone in the U.S.Trump will rack up lots of easy votes in the fall with his rabid fan base — older grumpy white males and their spouses who want change but don’t really know or care if Trump is a Republican or a Democrat.But voters who want to make America great again by being mean to Latinos or by putting tariffs on air-conditioners and iPhones won’t add up to a majority.If he wants to become president, Trump has to mend a lot of fences, say a lot of mea culpas and learn a bunch of important political and economic things.Like manners. Like humility. Like gravitas.And like making nice with the Bush/Cruz/Kasich conservatives he’s been insulting and demeaning with sophomoric cheap shots for the last year.The presumptive Republican nominee should start his political fence-repair work by trying to win over a few million women voters.It won’t be easy. Three-fourths of women think he’s a piece of dirt and wouldn’t vote for him if he was married to Hillary.I don’t know what it’ll take, or even if it’s possible, but somehow Trump has to prove that deep down he is not the sexist boor he’s been playing on TV.I know one thing he should not do — attack Hillary for enabling her lecherous husband Bill and attacking the women who say they were accosted by him.That didn’t work in the 1990s. All it did was make independent women vote for Hillary or stay home.Trump’s long march to victory over the Republican political establishment has been an amazing thing to watch — kind of like a TV miniseries where the bad guy never gets taken down in the end by the good guys.For a year he’s made fools of the media pundits and mincemeat of the professional politicians of his party.He’s the un-politician who broke all the rules of the primary game and won. That’s a big reason he got so many votes in so many states.We wanted a Washington outsider. What we got was a salesman. He did and said whatever he had to do to make the sale to the Republican electorate.As I tweeted earlier this week, the GOP is no longer the Party of Reagan, it’s the Party of Trump.Where he takes Republicans from here is anyone’s guess, but it’s probably going to be one of the wilder political rides in modern American history.If America gets lucky, Trump will hit his head on a tree limb and when he wakes up he’ll be a real conservative who runs on a platform of slashing government spending and abolishing the IRS.Or maybe he’ll hire some economists who can teach him why tariffs are bad for America because they punish consumers and not corporations.Or maybe someone will explain to him why building a 300-foot wall on the Mexican border and rounding up 11 million illegal immigrants is not how a free — and great — country should do immigration reform.Trump will need everybody he can get to defeat Hillary.Who he picks for vice president will be interesting, but it won’t really matter because we know people don’t vote for a president because they like the VP choice.It could be Rubio or Kasich, because that would help him in Florida and Ohio. It could be a Latina woman like Nevada Governor Susana Martinez.Or, knowing Trump, he might go outside the box and name one of his business partners we’ve never heard of. No one knows where he’s going to go until he goes there.There is one thing I know for sure. If Trump becomes president he won’t be able to treat the members of the G-7 or the G-20 the same way he treated the GOP 17.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more