Tag: 南京桑拿

Jacks look inward to solve issues heading into 2017

first_imgArcata >> Humboldt State women’s basketball head coach Michelle Bento-Jackson did as most of us do during the holiday break. She spent time with the family, unwrapped gifts and did much of what is a traditional holiday vacation — with one exception, however.“I just watched a lot of film on us,” the first-year HSU coach said, “That’s what I did over my Christmas break.”As far as basketball activities are concerned, aside from a short recruiting trip, Bento-Jackson watched hours and hours of …last_img read more

Giants to face dilemma in September if Johnny Cueto is ready to pitch

first_imgPHOENIX — Nine and a half months after undergoing Tommy John surgery, Giants pitcher Johnny Cueto threw a 40-pitch bullpen in front of Giants manager Bruce Bochy and pitching coach Curt Young at Chase Field.Cueto surprised the Giants with his progress and left Bochy optimistic the franchise’s highest-paid pitcher could return to a major league mound by the end of the season.“God willing, yes I want to pitch in September,” Cueto said through Spanish-language translator Erwin Higueros. “Right …last_img read more

Monkey See, Monkey Rationalize

first_imgIt’s a quirk of English that rational and rationalize have opposite meanings.  Be that as it may, the latter may have evolved into to the former, according to a story in the New York Times.  A monkey study using children as control subjects seems to indicate that Capuchin monkeys, like us, occasionally rationalize bad choices.    Expecting animals to exhibit subsets of human behaviors may be one thing, but the article transformed the monkeyshines into a tale of human evolution:For half a century, social psychologists have been trying to figure out the human gift for rationalizing irrational behavior.  Why did we evolve with brains that salute our shrewdness for buying the neon yellow car with bad gas mileage?The results of experiments with the monkeys were equivocal.  Nevertheless, reporter John Tierney chose the interpretation that rationalizing bad choices, also called cognitive dissonance, has positive evolutionary value; it conserves energy that would be spent second-guessing our bad decisions.  But then, how would we know this is not his own sour grapes for dismissing intelligent design? The compulsion to justify decisions may seem irrational, and maybe petty, too, like the fox in Aesop’s fable who stopped trying for the grapes and promptly told himself they were sour anyway.  But perhaps Aesop didn’t appreciate the evolutionary utility of this behavior for humans as well as animals.For assuming evolution, for promoting a monkey’s wisdom over Aesop’s, and for elevating cognitive dissonance as a Darwinian virtue, we award Stupid Evolution Quote of the Week to Mr. John Tierney.  Congratulations; enjoy your trip.No sour grapes here.  We love it when the Darwinists make fools of themselves.  As for us, we try to ration our rashness.(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

SA to hold labour relations indaba

first_img25 June 2013 Labour Minister Mildred Oliphant says her department will, together with other role players, convene a labour relations indaba where the future of collective bargaining and social dialogue in South Africa will be discussed. The issues of unprocedural strike action and violence during strikes will also be on the indaba agenda. Addressing a New Age breakfast briefing in Pretoria on Monday, the minister said her department was working closely with Nedlac and the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) to ensure that in the aftermath of Marikana and subsequent incidents of labour unrest, a “nation united in the view of how it wants to deal with challenges of industrial relations will rise”. Highlighting some of the work done by the government to bring stability to the labour relations environment, Oliphant said her department and others had engaged with organised labour and business to conclude a peace and stability framework for the mining sector. She said the working group on stability in the platinum industry had reached an advanced stage of discussions on a peace and stability accord. “As part of its deliberations, the working group has considered causes and effects of instability in the platinum sector and has proposed a set of solutions and actions. “This also resulted in the Framework for Peace and Stability in the Mining Industry on 25 February 2013, but as we know, it is touch and go with regards to commitment to implement this framework,” Oliphant said. Talks were also continuing on the envisaged nature of a new centralised bargaining arrangement in the platinum sector. Oliphant said efforts were under way to engage the leadership of the labour movement to discuss the adversarial nature of industrial relations. “A few weeks ago, we met with Cosatu, Nactu, NUM and Amcu. In the interactions with them, I appealed to their sense of patriotism to say, let us always put the interest of our country above all. What is the use of gaining all the members without a business to represent them in? “It was a difficult meeting and I have tasked the DG to organise a follow up engagement,” the minister said. “The department will also explore areas that present partnership possibilities, such as capacity building and communication with the labour movement.” For collective bargaining institutions to work, Oliphant said, strong and sophisticated union organisations and strong employer bodies were needed. “The bulk of the troubles in the collective bargaining processes mirror the state of organisation in the parties that are involved.” She stressed, however, that although she had sent representatives to help parties in dispute, it was not possible for her to become involved in every dispute. She warned that this carried the risk of undermining the very institutions that were set up to do this work. Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Monitor fields as crop reach maturity

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest As fall approaches and growers gear up for harvest, it is important that they continue to monitor and scout fields as crops reach maturity. Although at this point in the year it is too late for management practices such as rescue treatments, fungicides, etc., there is still a great deal to learn by walking through fields.With wet weather throughout the growing season, several diseases have developed in both corn and soybean fields across Ohio. For corn, there has been a higher incidence of common rust throughout the state. As of mid-August, southern rust has been discovered in some southwest Ohio corn fields. Gray leaf spot and northern corn leaf blight have also appeared in Ohio’s corn fields.In soybeans, diseases such as frogeye leaf spot and bacterial leaf blight have developed in many fields throughout the state. As growers walk fields this fall, they should take note of what diseases are present and make plans to deal with problem diseases either through management practices this fall and spring or with varietal selection for the 2018 crop.While scouting fields, and observing the crop development above ground, it is also a great idea to spend some time investigating what is going on below the soil surface. Taking time to dig up roots will help growers understand soil conditions in their fields, root development of crops, potential pest problems, and determine if any compaction exists. With the wet spring weather, heavy rain events, and field work performed in marginal conditions, there may be some areas of fields where compaction needs to be alleviated. Growers can determine if they may have soil compaction by digging roots up in several areas of fields, especially wet areas where water ponded this spring.As fall approaches growers should also be aware of weed pressure that exists in their fields and make plans for fall herbicide applications. As weeds become more of a challenge to control, both growers and agronomists have observed the benefits of fall applications of herbicides. Growers who routinely apply herbicides in the fall have a better chance of maintaining weed-free fields the following growing season.One final concern that growers should take note of as corn begins to mature is possible nitrogen deficiencies. Due to heavy rainfall and saturated soils during the 2017 growing season, it is not surprising to see some signs of nitrogen deficiency showing up in corn fields across the eastern Corn Belt. Whether applied preplant or sidedress, patterns of heavy rainfall and wet soils increase the likelihood of nitrogen being lost. Because nitrogen is an essential nutrient for corn plant development and ultimately yield, losses will impact final yields this fall.When saturated conditions persist, nitrogen can be lost though leaching or denitrification. Leaching (more likely to occur in course-textured soils) is the process where nitrogen is moved down through the soil profile and out of the root zone where it is not available to plants. The severity of nitrogen loss due to leaching is impacted the intensity and duration of rainfall. Denitrification is the process where soil nitrogen is biologically converted to gaseous nitrogen and lost to the atmosphere. During denitrification, microorganisms break down soil nitrogen and convert it to nitrogen gas when soil is saturated and oxygen is limited.Nitrogen deficiency symptoms initially appear as a “V” shaped yellowing on lower leaves that begins at the tip and progresses toward the stalk. Nitrogen deficiency can also cause ears with tip-back, poor kernel set, and shallow kernel development. Fields that have experience excessive rainfall, ponding, and saturated soils could be exhibiting the symptoms discussed above.While nitrogen deficiency has most likely impacted yields, another concern for eastern Corn Belt farmers this fall is stalk integrity. When nitrogen deficiencies exist, the corn plant will “cannibalize” its own stalk to produce an ear. As a result, stalks will be weakened and will be prone to lodging this fall. Fields where nitrogen deficiency has been observed should be harvested in a timely manner this fall to avoid harvest losses due to lodged corn plants.The 2017 growing season has been extremely challenging at times. Although everyone is looking forward to moving on to next year, it is important to take some time walking fields this fall in order to make sound management decisions that will ensure productivity next year.last_img read more

Ageless Roger Federer sounds confident warning on eve of Australian Open defense

first_imgPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hosting “I’m playing good tennis. I’m confident that I think it needs a good performance by my opponent probably to beat me,” said the third seed, who opens his defence against Uzbekistan’s Denis Istomin in Monday’s night match on Rod Laver Arena.A buoyant Federer revealed he had enjoyed a successful break coming into the 2019 season.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“Throughout my career, I’ve been very lucky that in the off-seasons I never had any setbacks,” he told reporters at Melbourne Park.“What I can say is the off-season was great for me. I think maybe it showed a little bit at the Hopman Cup already. Again, look, I’m playing tomorrow. We’ll see how it’s going to be here in Melbourne.” Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “I don’t think I should because I think that would be a mistake. I hope I can put myself in contention as the tournament goes deeper, but we’ll see.”Federer has skipped the European clay court season in recent years as he tries to manage his workload to extend a remarkable career, which shows no signs of slowing.He said he hadn’t made a decision on whether to play on clay this year and wasn’t sure why he had not suffered major injuries like Rafael Nadal, Djokovic and Andy Murray, who will retire this year with chronic hip pain despite being six years younger than Federer.“I think you also need a little bit of luck. Maybe also the way I play tennis, maybe it’s smoother than the other guys,” said Federer, renowned for his flowing movement around the court.“It just maybe looks that way. I work extremely hard in the matches as well. It just maybe doesn’t come across so much.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte MOST READcenter_img PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Federer’s first-round opponent Istomin caused a massive upset in Melbourne two years ago when he knocked out defending champion Novak Djokovic in the second round, outlasting the Serb over five sets.“I think the focus really is on those early rounds, especially tomorrow,” said Federer, whose victory against Marin Cilic in last year’s final was his 20th Grand Slam title.“I know what Denis did to Novak. I watched basically the entire game a couple years ago when he beat Novak here.Slim margins“I’ve had some tough ones against him in the past. He can play well in fast courts, and that’s what it’s going to be a little bit here as well,” added the world number three, who has won all six previous encounters against Istomin.“Depending on how you match up with your opponent, who is going to win the big points, the margins are so slim nowadays that I’m just not thinking too far ahead.ADVERTISEMENT Switzerland’s Roger Federer holds his trophy aloft after defeating Croatia’s Marin Cilic during the men’s singles final at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Sunday, Jan. 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)Ageless Roger Federer said Sunday he was in a confident mood and warned his rivals he was “playing good tennis” as he aims for a third successive Australian Open title.The Swiss master enjoyed a successful Hopman Cup warm-up in Perth and knows that at even the grand old age of 37 he has a great chance of a record seventh Melbourne crown and 21st major victory.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Serena Williams shooting for Slam history View commentslast_img read more

Serena: ‘I am not a cheat’, accuses tennis of ‘sexism’

first_imgNew York, Sept 9 (AFP) Serena Williams insisted she was not cheating in the US Open final on Saturday before accusing the sport which has made her a global icon and multi-millionaire of sexism. Naomi Osaka won the final 6-2, 6-4 to become Japan’s first ever Grand Slam singles champion and delay Williams’s bid for a record-equalling 24th major title. However, the final was overshadowed by the American’s angry and tear-filled tirade in the second set. It has already been dubbed ‘The Mother of all Meltdowns’ by the New York Daily Post. The 36-year-old was handed a code violation for coaching, a penalty point for racquet abuse and a game penalty for calling umpire Carlos Ramos a “liar and a thief” and insisting “you owe me an apology”. “He alleged that I was cheating, and I wasn’t cheating,” Williams told reporters later. “I don’t use on-court coaching (where it’s allowed at WTA tour events). “One thing I love about tennis is being out there. It’s the one time I don’t want to hear anyone tell me anything. You have to figure out. You have to problem-solve.” Williams said that her coach Patrick Mouratoglou had not been coaching her even though the Frenchman told ESPN that he had and that all coaches do it. “I just texted Patrick, like, What is he talking about? Because we don’t have signals. We have never discussed signals,” said Williams. Williams said the incident strengthened her belief that women players are treated differently to their male counterparts in the sport.advertisement “I’ve seen other men call other umpires several things. I’m here fighting for women’s rights and for women’s equality,” she claimed. “For me to say ‘thief’ and for him to take a game, it made me feel like it was a sexist remark. “He’s never taken a game from a man because they said ‘thief’. For me it blows my mind. But I’m going to continue to fight for women.” Williams made reference to the incident last week when French player Alize Cornet was warned for removing her shirt on court during a heatwave.Cornet was accused of “unsportsmanlike behaviour” before tournament chiefs apologised, admitting the umpire made the wrong decision.- A strong woman -================== “Cornet should be able to take off her shirt without getting a fine. This is outrageous,” said Williams warming to her theme. “I just feel like the fact that I have to go through this is just an example for the next person that has emotions, and that want to express themselves, and want to be a strong woman. “They’re going to be allowed to do that because of today. Maybe it didn’t work out for me, but it’s going to work out for the next person.” Williams left the media interview room to applause. Meanwhile, Mouratoglou took to Twitter to also take aim at Ramos. “The star of the show has been once again the chair umpire,” he wrote. “Should they be allowed have an influence on the result of a match? When do we decide that this should never happen again?” (AFP) ATKATKlast_img read more

a month ago​Leicester boss Rodgers explains Maddison switch

first_img​Leicester boss Rodgers explains Maddison switchby Ansser Sadiqa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveLeicester City boss Brendan Rodgers explained his decision to switch the role of star James Maddison.The Englishman got a chance at number 10 against Tottenham on Saturday.And he was the star of the show for Leicester, netting the winning goal in a 2-1 success over Spurs.”The change in personnel, that worked well for us,” Rodgers said to reporters after the game. “We tried to get another attacking player into the middle.”I felt at Manchester United, as well as we might have pressed the game sometimes, we needed to be more forward-thinking, so we brought him inside, and Harvey in [on the left].”He can play in a couple of positions, James. We saw him at the top of the diamond in the early part of the second half. He plays that role in behind very well.”We needed to be more aggressive in the game and take the ball, and he’s a player who will take the ball.” About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Joey Bosa Went Off On Twitter Critics Tonight

first_imgOhio State defensive end Joey Bosa is no stranger to the spotlight. He’s been one of the stars of the Buckeye defense for the past few seasons and is a projected top-10 pick in April’s NFL Draft. With that spotlight comes the attention of critics in the media, the stands, and sometimes on Twitter. Apparently, a group of people were trolling Bosa on there today, pulling up old tweets and trying to get his attention. They seemed to get it, but not in the way that they may have expected.Bosa ripped off a series of tweets mocking the Twitter critics. He deleted them almost immediately, but we screenshotted them before he did. bosa4bosa5bosa1bosa3Bosa is going to have several more years of dealing with taunting on social media. He’ll probably ignore it next time.Oh, by the way – that chicken looks really good.last_img read more

What A Badass Olympic Skier Can Teach Us About WorkLife Balance

3Slovakia34.0– 22Turkey16.0– 28Switzerland14.0– 25Germany14.0– 19Luxembourg16.0– 12Denmark18.0– Randall’s Finnish peer Aino-Kaisa Saarinen had a child around the same time that Randall did, and she told me that her country has a mandatory four-month paid leave for mothers, which she started a month before her due date. After the baby was born, she and her partner received further benefits, including leave that they could split as they chose between the parents. “In our case, the dad took all that,” Saarinen said. (Not to mention the paid leave that fathers are entitled to.)Randall has competed in the predominantly Europe-based World Cup without that kind of paid leave but with Breck in tow for the past two seasons. It hasn’t always been easy. Although she emerged from childbirth without any serious complications (not all women do, as tennis star Serena Williams’s story demonstrates), the snap in her muscles didn’t return right away. And during her time off, the U.S. team “had gotten so strong,” Randall said. She sat out the second World Cup weekend after her return because she wasn’t skiing as well as her teammates.There have been many men who’ve continued competing after adding a child to their family, said Chris Grover, head coach of the U.S. cross-country ski team, but very few women. “Many of these guys are not primary caregivers and tend to come to the races Thursday and head back home on Sunday night or Monday,” Grover said. And while fathers may experience sleepless nights just like mothers do, they don’t need to physically recover after childbirth.Randall and her husband have built their work and family life around her job. Ellis secured a job as a media coordinator for the ski federation, which allowed him to travel the World Cup circuit with her. “He got the job so that we could see each other in the winter,” Randall said.Randall breast-fed her son until about a month into the racing season. Realizing that there would be at least four mothers coming to the World Cup with babies, the ski federation worked with the athlete commission, national ski federations and organizing committees to make formal recommendations encouraging race venues to provide a “baby room” with appropriate provisions so that moms can breast-feed and care for their infants as needed. Randall thinks she used these rooms much more than others in her cohort of new mothers. She said that may be because the others live in Europe, where most of the races take place, and can travel back and forth between home and races on a weekly basis.In Finland, Saarinen benefits from laws that guarantee child care facilities will be available. “The government also pays for most of it,” she said. That’s not all. “We also get child money from the government, which is about 200€ per month, a baby box with 48 items, and free and mandatory monthly health checks for baby and for the mom.”Things are different in the U.S. According to a 2015 Pew Research Center survey, 62 percent of parents of infant or preschool-age children report difficulty finding affordable, high-quality child care in their community, regardless of their income.Because Randall and Ellis are both working while on the race circuit, their parents and some friends have stepped in to provide child care, but paying travel and accomodations for these helpers isn’t cheap. In part because of the cost, Breck won’t be accompanying his parents to Pyeongchang. After calculating that it would run something like $15,000 to $20,000 for them to bring him and a caretaker along, they decided to send him to his grandparents’ house in Canada instead.As well as things are working out for her now, Randall acknowledges that her current situation is not sustainable. And it probably wouldn’t be scalable to the whole workplace either. Grover acknowledged that it’s difficult to imagine a ski team traveling around Europe with all the coaching staff’s kids, in addition to the team athletes.Randall plans to retire from racing after this season but will remain in the sport. She is president of the U.S. branch of Fast and Female, a group that encourages girls to participate in sports, and she’s running for election as an athlete representative on the International Olympic Committee Athletes’ Commission. After two decades of competition, it feels right, she said. Success in a career like sports requires giving it your all, and that means family life can’t always come first. For a parent who wants to substantially take part in parenting, eventually something must give. 5Ireland26.0– 24Slovenia15.0– 23Belgium15.0– 6Hungary24.0– 16Austria16.0– 10Australia18.0– CountryLength of paid maternity leave, in weeks 20Netherlands16.0– 27Japan14.0– 7Italy21.7– 11Chile18.0– 29Iceland13.0– 2United Kingdom39.0– Source: OECD Family Database 15Canada17.0– 21Spain16.0– 35United States0.0 34Portugal6.0– 4Czech Republic28.0– 8Estonia20.0– 32Sweden12.9– 17France16.0– 13New Zealand18.0– 18Latvia16.0– 30Norway13.0– 1Greece43.0– 31South Korea12.9– Paid maternal leave policies around the worldAmong countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, 2016 33Mexico12.0– 14Finland17.5– 26Israel14.0– 9Poland20.0– Team USA has sent 20 fathers to Pyeongchang, but only one mother: Kikkan Randall. A three-time winner of cross-country skiing’s World Cup sprint title, Randall was part of a baby boom that happened after the 2014 Sochi Olympics, when four of the sport’s top athletes took time off from racing to give birth.1The others were Marit Bjoergen of Norway (whose silver medal in Saturday’s skiathlon earned her the title of most-decorated woman at the Olympic Winter Games), five-time Olympic medalist Aino-Kaisa Saarinen of Finland and Katja Visnar of Slovenia.These women didn’t just return to work — they came back to the highest level of a demanding sport, and all four are expected to compete in Pyeongchang. But Randall is doing so without the same safety net that her European colleagues have. And that’s left her facing the same challenge that many other American women experience: how to balance a grueling career with the demands of new motherhood. A job as arduous as being a professional athlete (or, say, director of policy planning at the State Department) has little room for compromise or scaling back, and that means that much of the parenting must fall to a spouse or outside help.The 2018 Games will be the fifth Olympic appearance for Randall, a 35-year-old cross-country skier from Alaska.2When I was an elite skier in the 2000s, Randall was an up-and-coming star. I never skied fast enough to make the Olympic team, and the U.S. women’s teams in 2002 and 2006 were unlikely contenders for medals. But since then, thanks in large part to Randall’s performance and leadership, the American women have become a force to reckon with — earning both World Cup and world championship titles. Minnesota native Jessie Diggins won the final World Cup race before Pyeongchang. In 2008, Randall, nicknamed Kikkanimal, made history by becoming the first American woman to win a World Cup in cross-country skiing. And in Pyeongchang, she has a legitimate shot at a medal.Mothers-to-be in most professions take time off after childbirth, but Randall’s situation was different: “I was on my maternity leave while I was pregnant,” she said. Because she remained on the U.S. ski team roster, she retained access to her health insurance, and most of her sponsors continued their support, in exchange for appearances, social media plugs and other publicity. She resumed training about three weeks after her son, Breck, was born in April 2016, with the support of her husband, Jeff Ellis, who parented while she trained. Having a husband who is willing to take on parental duties and, most importantly, to do so “unbegrudgingly” has been “a huge piece of the puzzle,” Randall said.There’s no such thing as a part-time return to work in elite sports, which usually require multiple training sessions each day, along with naps, massages, full nights of sleep and other recovery rituals. Of course, sleepless nights are almost a given for the first years of a child’s life. And Randall said that knowing Ellis will “take care of those night-time wakings before a race really helps.”She noted that her peers in Scandinavian countries have the benefit of paid time off for fathers as well as mothers. (Of the 35 countries that are members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the U.S. is the only one without paid maternal leave.) read more