Life expectancy of girls living in Englands poorest areas falls by almost

The life expectancy of girls living in the poorest areas of England has fallen by almost 100 days in the past five years, official figures show.The Office of National Statistics (ONS) yesterday released data showing that girls born in deprived areas in 2017 are expected to die more than three months earlier than those born in the exact same areas in 2012.Researchers said that the data revealed “a significant widening in the inequality of life expectancy”. Women in the most deprived areas in England can expect to live for 78.7 years, while women in the least deprived areas can live for 86.2 years – a gap of 7.5 years.In total, the data shows that women born in the most deprived areas of England had the biggest drop in their life expectancy. Between 2012 to 2014 and 2015 to 2017, the life expectancy at birth of women living in the most deprived areas in England fell by 98 days. In comparison, the life expectancy of women living in the least deprived areas increased by 84 days.Meanwhile boys born in the wealthiest areas of England can expected to live 95 days longer during the same period.Ben Humberstone, Deputy Director for Health Analysis and Life Events at the ONS, said: “We’ve found a large fall in life expectancy at birth among women living in the most deprived areas in England when comparing the periods 2012 to 2014 and 2015 to 2017. “This is in contrast to the continued increases in life expectancy for women living in the least deprived areas. This has led to a significant widening in the inequality in life expectancy at birth in England. Wales mirrored this pattern, although significant changes were not detected.”Mr Humberstone said that the analysis shows that life expectancy in the UK has stopped improving at the rate that was expected before 2011 and that further research is needed to analyse the factors contributing to this trend and the impact of deprivation. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.

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